Skip to main content

About your Search

20121129
20121207
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
on the basic approach to solve the fiscal cliff. in a letter to the president, house republicans called their offer a fair middle ground. it's a ten-year framework that cuts the deficit by $2.2 trillion. it includes $600 billion in health care cuts-- mostly medicare and medicaid-- $300 billion in other mandatory spending and $300 billion in cuts to all other federal spending. by contrast, the president has proposed around $600 billion in cuts to all entitlements, including medicare and he'd reduce other federal spending by $100 billion a year. the president has also proposed spending $50 billion in new stimulus and republicans have refused to consider it. the biggest difference by far is in how to raise new revenues. republicans would raise $800 billion by reducing tax loopholes, not with a tax rate increase. the president would double new revenues to $1.6 trillion, with most of that coming from higher taxes on households making more than $250,000. the president and his negotiators have told republicans there won't be a fiscal cliff deal without that tax increase. the white house today
called the fiscal cliff. our coverage starts on the white house lawn tonight with major garrett. major. >> reporter: scott, the saesident said for the first time, there is a two-step process to averting the fiscal cliff. republicans must act now to prevent a tax increase for households earning less than $250,000. do that now, president obama said, and he and congress can work out the details of spending cuts later. ( applause ) before a crowd of supporters, the white house invited from the mid-atlantic region, president obama put congressional republicans on notice. >> it's too important for washington to screw this up. now is the time for us to work on what we all agreed to, which is lets keep middle class taxes low. that's what our economy needs. that's what the american people deserve. gd if we get this part of it right, then a lot of the other issues surrounding deficit reduction in a fair and balanced, responsible way are going to be a whole lot easier. >> reporter: white house officials say mr. obama is not interested in personally meeting with congressional republicans because t
that are necessary to avoid the cliff, here's how house speaker john boehner described the status there. >> no, there's a stalemate. let's not kid ourselves. i'm not trying to make this more difficult. >> reporter: what set off this reaction was the president's proposal for $1.6 trillion in new taxes over ten years with tst of that coming from a tax hike on single americans making hire than $200,000 and married couples filing jointly making $250,000. boehner has hinted that republicans might raise half of that, $800 billion, but only by reducing tax loopholes. >> getting rid of special interest deductions and not raising rates we think is better for the economy, pure and ecole. >> reporter: there is also a gap on spending cuts. yemocrats say they've already agreed to cut one trillion dollars from future spending, republicans, including majority leader eric cantor, responded with this: >> all of a sudden they're asking for $1.6 trillion in tax hikes and nowhere near that number in spending reforms. >> reporter: democrats are angling to raise taxes on the rich now and negotiate tax reform and spending
hard numbers from the white house to resolve the fiscal cliff crisis landed with a thud on capitol hill. congressional republicans called it an insulting joke. here's the big picture-- $4 trillion of deficit reduction over the next 10 years. it includes $1.6 trillion in higher taxes on households make manage more than $250,000. there's also $400 billion in cuts to entitlement programs, like medicaid and medicare, as well as others. there is also fresh new aending. $50 billion next year in stimulus spending, all for infrastructure. the white house calls this an opening bid. house republicans call it a rehash of old ideas and also object to the idea of a white house asking a permanent legislative remedy to raising the debt ceiling, all of it, the republicans say rather, is unacceptable. now much of this was conveyed in a 28-minute phone conversation yesterday between president obama and house speaker john boehner. both sides describe that conversation, scott, as direct and candid. those are words custom early reserved for diplomacy between sworn adversaries and tonight that might be where
before that so- called fiscal cliff. that's the package of tax increases for most americans and budget cuts that will hit automatically unless the white house and congress find a gentler way to solve the crisis in the federal budget. here's how treasury secretary tim geithner put it on cnbc. >> is the administration prepared to go over the fiscal cliff? >> absolutely. again there is no prospect to an agreement that doesn't involve those rates going up on the top 2% of the wealthiest americans. remember, it's only 2%. >> pelley: by top 2%, he means individuals making more than $200,000 and couples taking in $250,000 or more. republicans say rates shouldn't be increased on anyone. with no agreement, going over the fiscal cliff would be painful. the automatic tax increases break down like this: households making $20,000 to $40,000 would see an increase in $1,200 a year. incomes of $40,000 to $64,000 would see taxes rise $2,000 and in the $64,000 to $108,000 bracket taxes go up $3,500 a year. mr. obama and the republican speaker of the house talked this over today and here's major garrett
the fiscal cliff? >> absolutely. there's no prospect to an agreement that doesn't involve those rates going up on the top 2% of the wealthiest americans. ren, it's only 2%. >> pelley: by 2%, he means individuals making more than $200000 and couples taking in 250,000 or more. republicans say rates shouldn't be increased on anyone. with no agreement, going over the fiscal cliff would be painful. the automatic tax increases break down like this: households making $20,000 to $4,000 would see an increase in $1,200 a year. incomes $40,000 to $64,000 would see taxes rise $2,000 and in the $64,000 to $108,000 bracket taxes go up $3,500 a year. mr. obama and the republican speaker of the house talked this over today and here's major garrett at the white house. major? >> reporter: scott, ther there a code of silence the white house and speaker boehner's try to apply to these phone conversations, releasing as few details as possible to protect the underlying negotiations. nevertheless, cbs news has learned the following: the speaker and the president spoke before treasury secretary tkpwaoeugter in'er
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)